Can you tell me how to setup the top few flounder fishing rigs?

Can you tell me how to setup the top few flounder fishing rigs?

The rig you want to use to catch flounder will vary depending on personal tastes and the condition on the bottom of the body of water in which you are fishing. The most common, or standard, rigging for flounder is made up of an egg sinker in anywhere from a one to three ounce weight. The stronger the current and deeper you will be fishing will determine how heavy the weight needs to be, with the weight increasing with both depth and current. Next you will need a swivel, a wide bend hook, and a leader. This rigging is called by different names such as fish-finder, Carolina rig, or sliding sinker. You may add variations such as spinner blades, colored beads, skirts, and different hook styles. If the water in which you will be fishing is cloudy, consider a dropper rig, and put the sinker at the bottom, with a couple of hooks tied above it. This way, the sinker will just tickle the bottom, and the hook will hang high enough for the flounder to be able to see it easily. This rigging also allows the angler to break the leader if it becomes tangled, without losing his hooks. Covering wide expanses of water is essential to catching a good number of flounder, making artificial lures very effective for terminal rigs. If you tie jig heads with artificial or natural fibers and tip it with live minnows, scented plastic trailers, or fish strips, you should have good luck. Trailers work particularly well on rocky bottoms, bottoms of oyster beds, and grassy bottoms where jigs tend to hang up easily. Consider using spoons with weed guards and strip trailers, when the spoon is rattled over that hard bottom. Sometimes, when it comes to fishing for flounder, simple is the best, and this rig is no exception. Just use a 1/0 (give or take, depending on the size flounder you are targeting) connect a circle hook to a swivel with 12 pound test and an appropriate egg sinker (allowed to slide freely) on a leader between your hook and swivel. Be sure to use small hooks for small fish and larger hooks for larger fish and gauge your bait size accordingly. Use small capsule floats or beads to add something special to attract the attention of the flounder, and you are well on your way to catching all the tasty flounder you can reel in!

Daniel Eggertsen
Dan Eggertsen is a fellow saltwater fishing enthusiast to the point of obsession. :) He's been providing solid advice on saltwater fishing since 2004.

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